The Who’s and What’s of a Wedding Reception WRPS – 6

The Who’s and What’s of a Wedding Reception WRPS – 6

The Who’s and What’s of a Wedding Reception

Hello my name is Jack Barros, professional wedding DJ and author of Modern Wedding Ceremony 101. An eBook on American wedding ceremonies available to you on my website

Welcome to this edition of the Wedding Reception Planning Series, a set of articles designed to provide you the information you need to plan the wedding reception of your dreams.

This edition; ‘Who Does What at My Wedding Reception?’ 

Most of the roles in weddings are easy to figure out and determine who will perform the various ceremonies and rituals associated with American wedding receptions.

There are a couple of parts of the wedding reception where modern influences have added to the options we have to choose from.

The 2 areas we will discuss are the wedding Blessing and the Wedding Toast.

The blessing is often done by whomever performed the wedding ceremony. Traditionally the ceremony would have been done by a priest, pastor or a government official. The majority of weddings are still done in this manner.

In my home state of Massachusetts, residents are now able to get licensed for the day to perform the wedding ceremony in place of clergy or public officials. Now you may have a good friend or relative perform the wedding ceremony for you.  

The wedding blessing, is typically done immediately following the introductions.  Anyone can perform the blessing at your wedding reception. In the case where the wedding ceremony official will not be attending the wedding reception, then there are other options. I usually suggest a religious family member or someone close to you that would be honored to perform the blessing for you.

In many instances, I have been asked to perform the blessing for my couples. In these cases, I use a blessing that is generic enough not to offend any of your guests and is done in a way as no one feels forced into partaking of the ritual.

A sample blessing: Ladies and Gentlemen, In the absence of clergy I have been asked to say the blessing today. For those of you that would like to join us, please bow your head. Lord thank you for blessing these two in marriage. It is the greatest way we know to show our love for one another. We ask that you bless this marriage and the food we are about to eat, and all the festivities we are about to partake in, we ask this in your name. Amen

Another area of a wedding reception that sometimes needs clarification is the wedding toast. Traditionally the host would welcome the guests and then the best man would propose a toast to the newlyweds.

Nowadays the emcee will welcome your guests and introduce the best man. What there has been is a trend in recent years where more and more members of the bridal party are also proposing toasts to the newlyweds.

What happens in a wedding toast is that all the guest will be asked to stand for the toast. The newlyweds, as guests of honor will remain seated.  The best man will be introduced. He would then introduce anyone else that would be speaking. 

There is not a right or a wrong way. If a member of your bridal party is comfortable with speaking in public, then they may do so. You know your friends and should act accordingly. We’ve all seen wedding toast fails on YouTube!

One last tip for brides or grooms that would like to thank their guests for coming and are comfortable with public speaking then right after the toast is the best time,

Find out when to Cut the Cake at your wedding reception in our next article.

Thanks for viewing. Have a Great Day!

Stop by the website for your free copy of my eBook Modern Wedding Ceremony 101

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Wedding DJ Jack ‘Jacky B’ Barros

Great Music Great Fun Class Act

Boston, Worcester, Newport Wedding DJ

Wedding receptions, wedding introductions, wedding toasts, wedding blessing, wedding DJ

 

 

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Wedding DJ Jack ‘DJ Jacky B’ Barros
Proudly Serving the Worcester, MA area and beyond
302.715.1435

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